Look closely at this picture.  More closely.  Anyone see It?

Look closely at this picture. More closely. Anyone see It?

Late this morning I was driving down Main Street in L’Anse, suddenly desiring two scrambled eggs and homemade whole wheat toast from the Nite Owl.  With a cup of steaming hot tea.  However, to my dismay, not a single parking spot presented itself.  The car was forced to turn right and steer down by the Keweenaw Bay.

When suddenly, directly ahead, There It Was!  A rainbow of beautiful colors arching across our Lake Superior.  The wild and dark rain-laden clouds filled the sky, but there was a slice of sun shining through.  I lurched out of the car at full speed and sprinted toward the shore.  It looked like the rainbow was about to fade.  I fumbled to turn the camera on and snapped and snapped and snapped, attempting to will the bright colors into the camera lens. 

But no.  Only a faded arch showed up against our tumultuous sky.  My camera sighed and turned to look for other possibilities. 

Red bench, lake and sky

Red bench, lake and sky

At first, I only noticed the lake and clouds and benches.  Breathed in the fresh October air and thought, “Ahhh, it’s good to be here in downtown L’Anse along the lakefront.  I should stop here more often.”  (How often do we think that?  Once we’ve actually veered off our usual route and stopped some place where we don’t interrupt our routine often enough.)

How close can we get?

How close can we get?

Then I noticed Them.  A beach-full of seagulls.  They looked so intriguing.  And then my tracking instincts from Tom Brown Jr.’s Wilderness Survival School came back.  I would track those seagulls.  See how close it was possible to sneak before they burst into flight. 

Seagull Track in sand

Seagull Track in sand

Perhaps a “real” tracker could sneak close enough to stroke a feather.  Maybe a tracker with some experience could approach within a foot or two.  You move very slowly when tracking, very slowly.  I moved way too quickly in this attempt, although paused repeatedly to look nonchalantly out to the bay as if to reassure the gulls.  She’s not really getting that close, they certainly thought.   She’s just admiring the waves. 

Seagull feather and stones

Seagull feather and stones

Feathers littered everywhere on the sand.  And other seagull remains, of which we shall not discuss in a polite blog.  The birds shifted.  Began to look a little perturbed.  The stalker was getting much too close.  A few creatures waddled away, squawking.  I really should have stared longer and more nonchalantly at the clouds and waves, but suddenly the thought of scrambled eggs and homemade toast re-surfaced.  The Nite Owl has really good homemade toast.  What am I doing stalking seagulls anyway?  Surely there are available parking spaces now.

Fly away!

Fly away!

Off they flew, a flurry of white wings rising in the sky, gulls flapping and squawking toward the disappeared rainbow.  I turned back toward the car, headed for strawberry jam on homemade toast.

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