And the mystery photo from yesterday’s blog is…

And the mystery photo is…

Close your eyes if you don't want to see this dead snake.

Close your eyes if you don't want to see this dead snake.

I made the mistake yesterday of showing Barry this picture while he was eating lunch.  Note:  do not try that at home.  Some people apparently do not want to view dead animals while chewing food. 

Today was a garden day.  Tomorrow will be a garden day.  The next day will be a garden day.  Because this is the time of year when the garden demands to be harvested…or else.

Or else the peas grow hard and gnarly.  Or else the cilantro turns to seed.  Or else the lettuce grows bitter and stringent.  Or else the onions fall over and rot. 

It’s tough work, gardening.  But so worth it in the end when you sit down to a freshly tossed salad with some minced onions and herbs and mini cucumbers and tomatoes and carrots.  (Not that we’ve seen any edible versions of these last three vegetables…yet.)

Jack (of Jack & the Beanstalk fame) could climb this pea plant up to the heavens.

Jack (of Jack & the Beanstalk fame) could climb this pea plant up to the heavens.

So here’s the garden report.  The peas are skyrocketing.  They reached the clouds this week.  Laden with bright flashy peas and white flowers.  They dazzle; they zoom.  They’re good eating.  We have the edible pod variety, and the non-edible pod.  Some of the pods were blanched and frozen today. 

The lettuce:  abundant.  Too much to eat.  Need to clean it in bags and give to friends.  We’re thinking people at Barry’s work might especially enjoy.  Onions:  falling over and ready to harvest.  They’re not too big, but our onions never would win county fair prizes.  There’s enough to eat until Christmas.

Onion power!

Onion power!

Carrots…well I’m still working on thinning them adequately.  First you do an initial thinning, to allow room for the orange roots to grow.  Then you thin the thinnings to allow even more growth space.  And finally, later this month, you pull one up and test to see if it’s adequately grown.  Usually they’re small, but adequate.  We don’t live in a field, you know.  One makes do in the middle of the woods, especially when the biggest plant in our garden is a large spruce tree that thirstily drinks up the moisture needed to nurture the plants.

The round curve of our carrot crop

The round curve of our carrot crop

Now let’s discuss something really measly.  Our zucchini.  So far it isn’t spreading and flowering very well.  (I think they’ve just announced it was the third coldest July on record.  The warm weather plants have been whining and whimpering daily.  They’re sun and heat deprived.  And refusing to grow until  they see some higher temps.  There’s rumors that this might happen by the weekend.  And frost is usually showing its white face by September.  We may have to cover the garden plants this year, that’s for sure.)

Measly stunted zuchini, wouldn't you say?

Measly stunted zucchini, wouldn't you say?

Beans…iffy.  They may make it or they won’t.  They’re reached the top of the bean fence, but they look stringy and not very enchanting.  Barry says they won’t make it.  I say they will.  I would show you a picture so you could better assess, but liked the angle of these leaves better.

Sweet bean leaves wrap around pole

Sweet bean leaves wrap around pole

And finally, the tomatoes.  They are coming, oh so slowly.  Round balls peek up from amidst the greenery.  If they’re dreaming of red, they have many nights before ripening.  We have many days before the knife slices a sweet round tomato, salt and pepper bless it, and the eager mouth finds it.  Until then…still searching for that farmer’s market tomato.  Maybe Saturday?

Some day.  Some day.

Some day. Some day.

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