The Huron Bay at dusk

The Huron Bay at dusk

Well.  It’s time to report back to you today about Day # 221 of the outdoor commitment.  Yes.  And, truly, there’s not much to say.

Here’s what happened outside:  after work and running errands in town and having lunch with a friend, I came home and lugged the new laptop out on the desk and wrote a blog for another site.  About (and I suppose this does not surprise any of you) “Did you remember to meditate while brushing your teeth?”  Then Barry and I picked pea pods in the garden for a Szechuan tofu pea pod stir-fry.  Later we leisurely ate outside on the deck, enjoying good garden food.  Ahhh…the joys of a simple times outside. 

I didn’t even pick up the camera today, so there are no new photos.  The above photo of dusk along the Huron Bay occurred during a visit two nights ago with our company.  The following photo (taken yesterday morning on the way to Little Mountain) has a small story attached.

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Sandhill Crane

Amy, Daniel and I were driving leisurely through Aura in our separate vehicles.  First we witnessed a partridge couple crossing the road.  Then…what could they be?  Wild turkeys?  Or…could it be?…sandhill cranes?  Yes!

I leaped from the car, and conferred with the visitors.  Should I try to get a photo?  Even without the zoom lens?  Someone must have said “yes” because I proceeded to scurry through the mostly-open field dotted with trees, attempting to photograph the four majestic birds.  Forget the fact it was private property.  Forget the fact that the birds were backing away rather quickly, alarmed at the human apparition attempting to reach them. 

I never got close enough to get a really good photo.  The photo below is what the actual picture looked like before the computer’s crop function accomplished its good deed:

See that sandhill crane?  Anybody see it?

See that sandhill crane? Anybody see it?

My friend Catherine could tell you lots of information about sandhill cranes.  They nest in her fields each spring.  She knows so much about these birds.  I only know that they look beautiful, and seem elusive.  And would like to see them up close.  Perhaps you have to earn that honor.

This is probably enough for tonight.  Will leave you with a photo taken near the strawberry fields a week or two ago.  I believe they’re fireweed which grow abundantly around here.  If we could get a little closer up (for example, perhaps cropping the photo) we could determine if they are actually fireweed or purple loosestrife, which has a bad reputation.  Loosestrife is an invasive plant, so they say, and should be rooted and disowned and scorned.  I don’t like the sounds of that.  How ’bout we appreciate all the plants on this planet, even the invasive ones?  Why declare war on plants? 

On that note, a peaceful goodnight to all.

Pure beauty

Pure beauty

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