Corn cob in the woods

Corn cob in the woods

I am so lazy these days.  Don’t know if it’s the 80-some degree temperatures or the fact we have visitors or the shifting season.  Soon the garden demands attention.  The logs need to be split.  The grass needs to be mowed.  In the meantime, laziness feels so good.

I barely could find enough energy to meander around the perimeters of the yard with camera in hand.  Surely there would be something interesting at the edge of yard?  Besides mosquitoes.  I wanted to take a photo of an engorged biting mosquito, but couldn’t wait that long before slapping it away.

So, there, up ahead.  What in the world is a corn cob doing, lying in the woods?  Looks like something ate all the kernels.

View of our deck from the woods

View of our deck from the woods

Oh yes, now I recall.  The “something” that ate the corn was us.  We have a strange habit of flinging corn cobs into the woods after we’ve eaten them.  Nothing else.  Just corn cobs.  Years ago one of us cheerfully and impulsively tossed the cob off the deck on a hot summer evening.  Now it’s a ritual.  Sometimes we see who can throw them the farthest.

Where the corn cob lies

Where the corn cob lies

We’ll be eating a lovely dinner on the deck later this evening.  A farewell dinner for Christopher and his girlfriend.  Tomorrow their plane flies to Chicago, and then they’ll wing it to San Diego.  What a fun visit this has been.  Hopefully we’ll see them before another eighteen months have passed.
Shiny green leaf possibly munched by insects

Shiny green leaf possibly munched by insects

I shall leave you with a poem by naturalist and poet Gary Snyder based on a Mohawk prayer.  Let’s expand our definition of family even wider this day.

Prayer for the Great Family

Gratitude to mother earth, sailing through night and day–and to her soil:      

rich, rare and sweet

In our minds so be it.

 

Gratitude to the plants, the sun facing light changing leaf and fine root hairs;

standing still through wind and rain;

their dance is in the flowing spiral grains.

In our minds so be it.

 

Gratitude to the air, bearing the soaring Swift and the silent Owl at dawn.

Breath of our song clear spirit breeze.

In our minds so be it.

 

Gratitude to Wild Beings, our brothers, teaching secrets, freedoms, and ways;

who share with us their milk;

self-complete, brave and aware.

In our minds so be it.

 

Gratitude to Water:  clouds, lakes, rivers, glaciers, holding or releasing–

streaming through all our bodies salty seas.

In our minds so be it.

 

Gratitude to the sun:  blinding pulsing light through trunks of trees, through

mists, warming caves where bears and snakes sleep–he who wake us.

In our minds so be it.

 

Gratitude to the Great Sky

Who holds billions of stars–and goes yet beyond that–beyond all powers,

and thoughts and yet is within us–Grandfather space and the Mind is his wife.

So be it.

 

 

 

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