ooops, there goes the bird feeder

ooops, there goes the bird feeder

Mr. or Mrs. Bear scored a hit the other night.  We think it’s the same rather large bear that Barry saw a couple weeks ago at 3:50 a.m.  He (or she) swiped the bird feeder.  We awoke yesterday morning to this sideways view.

Someone suggested it might be a raccoon.  But Barry thinks a raccoon wouldn’t have enough heft to bend the pole at such an angle.  I think he’s right!  Definitely, it was a bear. (We’ve seen similar behavior over the years in regards to the bird feeder and compost bin…and once we actually saw a huge black bear pawing in the compost.)

Today’s outdoor activity involved splitting more wood.  However, I don’t want to talk about it.  Let’s just say we finished the un-split pile behind the house (six sessions thus far) and now we’re ready to move to the huge pile in the driveway.  Sigh.  Seems like most of my outdoor adventures in June will involve some sort of wood splitting.

Aren't they lovely horses?

Aren't they lovely horses?

Since we won’t be talking any more about wood splitting today, can I just show you some leftover photos from the “end May” folder on this computer?  Photos not yet posted, but perhaps interesting to some folks.

The above photo depicts our friends Bertha and Bob’s horses.  They were casually munching grasses and weeds in the field yesterday while we lingered at their house enjoying a great potluck dinner.  One of the horse’s names is Dawn.  I believe that’s the white one.  I may have even ridden her years ago.  The other horse may be named Ben.  I am ready to stand corrected on that name.  They are good friendly horses.  It would have been lovely if they wandered closer, for a better photo opportunity.

Three new spruce buds (or fingers, or whatever you want to call them)

Three new spruce buds (or fingers, or whatever you want to call them)

The woods green up daily.  When you look beyond our deck, the forest is starting to take on its impenetrable green hue.  Look at the growth on the spruce!  Who knows, they may even double this size before the growing season ends.

The intimate inner world of ferns

The intimate inner world of ferns

Besides ferns, the world is a a-blaze in flowers.  Wild flowers and garden-variety flowers.  First, let’s examine a blood-root flower.  It’s toxic.  The Peterson Field Guides of Eastern/Central Medicinal Plants warn:  Toxic.  Do not ingest.  But it shares a magic spell:  A bachelor of the Ponca tribe (wherever the Ponca tribe might be) would rub a piece of the root as a love charm on the palm of his hand, then scheme to shake hands with the woman he desired to marry.  Within five or six days, sure enough, the woman would be willing to marry the fellow.  Hmmm, what do we think of this?
The bloodroot plant

The bloodroot plant

Finally, a garden plant.  From our perennial garden, facing the north in front of our house.  It is the primrose plant.  Sweet with the morning dew, it beams its red beauty into the world.  Hoping you’re enjoying all the lovely blooming flowers this season…and hoping bears aren’t knocking down YOUR bird feeders!

Primrose in the perennial garden in front of our house

Primrose in the perennial garden in front of our house

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