Central Park lake with skyscrapers on horizon

Central Park lake with skyscrapers on horizon

We took the Subway up to Central Park today, after stopping in at Kiah’s work to meet her co-workers.  They all told me how much they liked her, so that was wonderful!  We grabbed two coffees and a hazelnut raisin flute.  For any of you Midwesterners or country-folk, a “flute” is a long thin braid of bread.  Oh how lovely!  We found a sturdy gray rock in the park and lounged while munching our flute and sipping coffee with soymilk.  Ahhh, the joys of life!

 

Want to rent a boat for a little row around the park?

Want to rent a boat for a little row around the park?

We wandered around the park for several hours, exiting only for lunch.  It was one of my favorite days thus far!  (Are you surprised?)  I remember hearing about Central Park back in the 1970’s.  It was some shady place where women were murdered, if you believed all the newspaper reports.  It certainly wasn’t this beautiful enchanting family-filled green world in the midst of a busy city filled with laughter, companionship, relaxation and blooming flowers.

We read, we talked, we wandered, we explored everything from the castle to the lakes to the reservoir, we wished we had thought to bring a blanket.  If we had a blanket, we would have napped.

 

Woman reading...82 degrees and sunny

Woman reading...82 degrees and sunny

Here’s what I like about the city, as of tonight.  So much diversity exists!  I consider myself quite open-minded and liberal, but New York City kept opening more and more of my inner doors.  The wide variety of races, inclinations, and languages in every shape and form makes one realize even more that we are not limited to one race, one was of life, one way of thinking.  What a joy to begin to realize this even deeper.  The amount of diversity in “things to do” also keeps one occupied, inspired, learning new things.

However, in Central Park I also saw the disadvantages to walking in the midst of a nature that is so pruned and controlled.  The “real” woods is full of fallen trees, rotting wood, brambles and what might look like chaos to the unpracticed eye.  Well, maybe even to the “practiced” eye.  These parks are cultured gardens.  They are beautiful and intriguing, but very little like their wild cousins.

 

Blooms

Blooms

 

Cute little girl, isn't she?

Cute little girl, isn't she?

 Later in the evening we played cribbage in another park, called Stuyvesant Square.  I grew up thinking we were related to Peter Stuyvesant, the first governor of New York City.  He had one peg-leg and a mean reputation.  The actual family tree, completed years later, revealed we were kin to Anneke Jens Bogordus, a fellow Dutchman who helped settle this area.  I used to talk to Anneke at about age fourteen in my imagination.  

So tonight we dealt cards and played a mean game of cribbage beneath Peter’s statue.  Seems like half of Manhattan was enjoying the day in the parks, just like us.  

 

Peter Stuyvesant's statue (a friend of our ancestor)

Peter Stuyvesant's statue (a friend of our ancestor)

It’s almost time to say goodbye and return to the North Woods where Spring is just coming into her full beauty.  Where the woods are a little bit more wild and uncontrolled.  We’ve heard that a wildfire burned about 400 acres less than ten miles from our house, and the temperature hit 92 yesterday afternoon.  My husband said, “Are you coming home soon?” when we talked on the phone today.  He said there hasn’t been Internet at our house in two days.  Yikes!  Hope it’s operating by the time the plane lands…

 

What a wonderful trip!

What a wonderful trip!

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