No wonder they called it the Blossom Moon

No wonder they called it the Blossom Moon

 The Annishnabe called the May moon “The Blossom Moon”.  Some other Native American names for this month include When Women Weed Corn, When the Ponies Shed their Shaggy Hair, Idle Moon, Planting Moon (or literal translation:  Putting it in a Hole Moon), When the Horses Get Fat, Migratory Geese Moon and the Moon when the Little Flowers Die.

Our Little Flowers are just sprouting up every place you can imagine.  I’m wondering how they’re enjoying the weather today.  IT SNOWED!!  Twice.  Once this morning, about 10:30 a.m., as we were sitting around the kitchen table.  We looked outside and, sure enough, flakes of snow drifted lazily to the ground.  And then not so lazily.  But they weren’t easily photographed, so you’ll have to take my very sorry word for it.  The thermometer lingered in the 30’s all day and I wanted to stay inside again.  But found the warm coat and ventured outside and of course it proved enjoyable.

Burdock burs...Nature's own Velcro

Burdock burs...Nature's own Velcro

I loved this photo of the burdock prickly burs taken on the leek-hunting day.  They seemed to shimmer in the sun.  They’re not so fun when they stick on your pants, your shirt, your boots.  Some of them caught in my sneaker shoelaces and this morning it was necessary to pick them out.  I don’t know if anyone has eaten burdock root?  It’s an extremely healthy addition to soups and stews when chopped fine and simmered a long time.  (especially good in vegetarian split pea soup where it imparts a smoky flavor.)

Dandelion greens

Dandelion greens

Speaking of wild edibles, the above dandelion greens were dinner.  In addition to a few other dishes.  Barry was kind of wrinkling his nose, as our dandelions last year proved a tad too bitter.  But we simmered a bunch, salt & peppered it, and prepared to eat our vitamins.  When…surprise!…they were mild and delicious.  We’ve even decided to harvest more for tomorrow night’s dinner.  (If you can pick them young enough, they still taste mild.  If they’re too old…wait til next year.)  They provide incredible healing power, energy and cleansing after a long winter and should be eaten by all.  Yep.  That’s what I think.

Old Thyme and New Thyme

Old Oregano and New Oregano

Continuing on the food theme, I’ve begun cleaning out our oregano patch.  You have to break off all the old stalks and clean up leaves and toss everything in the woods.  I was carrying the stalks off to discard when this sweet duo appeared.  Dried oregano flowers, pressed in heavy books, can also be glued onto card stock to make pretty greeting cards.  My mother-in-law even framed her oregano card!

Rock with green grasses

Rock with green grasses

This grey rock with the deep rich green grasses sweeping upward along it seemed somehow artistic.  Or poetic.  It was a good break from cleaning up the perennial flower garden to admire the rock. 

And finally:

Baby blue robin eggs on the garage windowsill

Baby blue robin eggs on the garage windowsill

Looks like flowers and shrubs aren’t the only things blossoming!  We’ll be seeing baby robins in the nest one of these days.

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