Spooky old tangled undergrowth

Spooky old tangled undergrowth

Today I convinced Barry to explore a haunted and overgrown stretch of outdoors in the Copper Country.  Old crumbled buildings sink into the earth, and tangles of brush and trees rise everywhere.  The earth smells different here, as if memories of yesterday still linger in between the old fallen rock walls, in that silent building, beneath trees which keep long secrets.

You walk quietly among the old ones, never sure what might collapse beneath your feet.  Caution keeps one alert.  The steep slope of the hillside also makes you sure to stay balanced and upright.

Oh how fascinating everything was in its spooky aged splendor.  How I wouldn’t want to be here under a full moon on Halloween Eve!

Tumbled-down old wall

Tumbled-down old wall

We bickered back and forth about who got to carry the camera.  Each of us kept deciding such-and-such angle looked more interesting or provocative.  It’s amazing how two people can look at the same landscape and see different angles, different shots, different perspectives. 

And then…and then…are you ready for this?  In the midst of this barren and desolate and decaying place we saw…the first wildflower!!  After weeks of studious hunting, there she was in her blooming glory:

A dandelion

A dandelion

Barry countered with the idea that a dandelion wasn’t a “real” wildflower.  “A lawn weed” he called it. I was terribly insulted on behalf of the dandelion and demanded an apology.  He is under the–mistaken–impression that “real” wildflowers might be varieties such as wood anemones, lady slippers, violets and forget-me-nots.  I wanted him to get closer and examine the delicate floral essence of the yellow wildflower.  I don’t know why people become prejudiced about dandelions.  I would like a whole lawn full, thank you!  They are awesome!  And, by the way, it’s time for all of us to eat some of the spring dandelion greens, as well.  Yes, they can be a tad bitter.  But they’re a good spring tonic.  Yep, that could be a new blog topic coming up soon…

The dried leaves of this tangled undergrowth were dotted with very strange fungus-like black spots.  It makes one wonder why.  What created those black stains?  Human-made by-products leaching on the soil?  Or something else?

A strangely spotted leaf

A strangely spotted leaf

The trees in the woods around our house are not usually covered with vines.  Therefore, when one spies a vine-covered tree it becomes utterly intriguing.  It’s as if the undergrowth attempts to merge with the tree.  It added to the mystery of the place.

Vines and undergrowth snaking up a tree

Vines and undergrowth snaking up a tree

Just as we were discussing the spookiness of this place, a crudely scribbled message appeared on a brick, sending shivers up my spine:

Who Killed Amanda Palmer???

Who Killed Amanda Palmer???

Barry said, “Oh!  Look!  A perfect picture for your blog!”  and I said with a hushed voice, “No, you have to be kidding, what if it’s a local girl who was murdered?  What if she was murdered…here?” 

Well, I’m here to report that we googled it and Amanda Palmer was not a local girl.  It’s a play, a book, alternative punk-flavored music.  You may even have seen it playing around the country.  In fact, we may be the very last people on the planet to have heard about Who Killed Amanda Palmer.  But we’re educated now.  Barry, in a classic rock band for 20 years, found the pounding piano-driven music refreshing! It certainly wasn’t hip-hop and it wasn’t country twangy–and it wasn’t rock. But who killed the girl, anyway?

You just have to wander around outside in spooky overgrown areas and…you never know what you might learn or discover. Something new every day.

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