Ice melting on Keweenaw Bay in L'Anse

Ice melting on Keweenaw Bay in L'Anse

You know the feeling when you’ve been peering too intently at details for awhile?  Our eyes get bleary and we realize we’re focusing rather exclusively on the small picture, the minute aspects, the details.  Suddenly we expand our vision and see the BIG PICTURE.

Ahhh, to relax and witness the larger landscape.  They say the eagle soars high above us in the sky and witnesses the world entirely different than many of us humans.  Its view rotates in an all-encompassing way.  It perhaps sees the lake, the seagulls, the nest, the people, the trees, the hills, the boats and the fish as a connected whole rather than separated into minuscule parts.  (Except maybe when it’s hungry, it only sees the fish…) 

When we suddenly feel cramped or too focused from examining, say, the whorls on tree bark or tiny wintergreen berries or listening to our minds re-hash certain incidents for the fifty thousandth time…maybe it’s a moment to expand our view and see the wider picture.  Pause and allow our minds to rest in the 360 degree view that always surrounds us.

The Eagle Pond (or "Timmy's Pond, depending on who you are)

The Eagle Pond (or "Timmy's Pond, depending on who you are)

Yesterday I walked down to the Eagle Pond, pausing to examine dozens of details.  Snap the camera, snap, snap.  Always going smaller, into the details, into the lines and colors and etchings.  Today we’ll expand larger.  Do you actually want to see the pond itself?  Readers, meet the Eagle Pond.  Eagle Pond, meet my friends and family and other lovers of the outdoors.

The eagles soar here every day

The eagles soar here every day

The first photo highlighted the Keweenaw Bay.  This picture reveals our Huron Bay.  There’s a jutting peninsula that settles out onto Lake Superior between the two bays.  That’s where we live.  Keweenaw Bay is like the big brother or big sister to the Huron Bay, which measures much smaller.

I loved the sky.  It seemed milky yesterday.  A bald eagle flew off toward the other side of the bay, probably disturbed because I settled myself under its tree perch.  Such majestic flapping of wings, such a noble head and white tail feathers.  The immature eagles take four to five years to reach full plumage with the white tail; as youngsters they’re mottled and spotty dark brown and white.

Cheri and Art Jones, our neighbors (and blog readers!)

Cheri and Art Jones, our neighbors (and blog readers!)

OK, moving slightly away from soaring with the eagles and experiencing the wider view, and coming down to earth…I had a very exciting outdoor adventure today!  I walked down the road to meet Cheri and AJ, who are regular readers of this blog, from Ohio.  They have a garage where they’re camping on our road, and plan to retire here eventually. 

Cheri and AJ were probably the only readers anxious to get me home from the Florida vacation so they could hear how spring was progressing in the Upper Peninsula.  “Yes, yes, Florida’s OK and everything, BUT…”  

I tried to lure them on a tramp through the woods to a gorgeous ravine, but they were heading back to Ohio today.  Oh darn!  Next time, we all agreed.  They are the nicest couple and I feel really grateful that the space of this blog brought us together.  Stay tuned, you guys, for LOTS more Upper Peninsula outdoors adventures in the next…how many days?…getting out the calculator…256 days!

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