Looking up to a world of gray

Looking up to a world of gray

You people who live in spring-country.  You people who are enjoying 40 degree or 50 degree or 60 degree days.  We’re all envious of you now.  Because do you know what the weather was like today in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan?

The thermometer barely nudged 30 degrees.  A cold biting wind nipped in from the northwest.  And the skies stayed leaden gray all day.  (Well, make me a liar.  My husband said the temperature has inched up to 33 degrees as evening settles in…and the sun is poking through the clouds.  Go figure.  Just when you start stating facts, things change…)

Anyway, you get the drift about the weather most of the day.  It was so gray it settled into everyone’s spirits.  People here are ready for spring.  They’re ready for sunshine.  They’re ready for green.  This is the season where we wait it out.  We are prepared for spring, but we settle for this in-between season.  Sometimes cheerfully. Sometimes with gritted teeth. 

Birch face says:  "Don't sweat it.  Spring's coming soon."

"The Scream" in white birch!

We traveled up to Houghton today to buy organic vegetables, grains, beans and other supplies at the co-op.  We drive there once every week or two to get supplies that can’t be found in our small town.  We planned to stroll leisurely around town, maybe along the canal, snapping photos and enjoying an outdoor experience in the “real” city. 

But no.  It was too cold.  We weren’t dressed properly in heavy winter coats.  The thermometer up there mocked “24 degrees”.  The wind whipped around buildings.  Snow covered the path by the icy canal and we wore shoes rather than boots.

Instead, I walked through the woods after returning home.  You’re sheltered in between all those trees.  It’s almost pleasant.  You have your boots and warm winter coat and mittens.  Besides the gray skies attempting to envelop everything, it’s almost pleasant.

Yesterday we experienced sun.  So don’t think it’s always gray here.  I sat in the woods on a log and watched shadows play.  Look at the balsam shadows dancing on this fallen tree:

Forest shadow play

Forest shadow play

But back to our gray discussion.  Maybe if we experience a good rain the dust and dirty snow might disappear.  In the meantime, we wait.  It’s only April.  One year, who knows what year, the temperature reached 90 degrees in late April.  No fooling.  It happened.  (My husband just said it was April, 1980, and my parents came to visit with cross-country skis atop their car.)

Anything is possible!

The stream behind our house is running merrily with melted snow-water down toward the bay.  Doesn’t it look cheerful?  I’m guessing we’ll be warm soon.  If we get beyond tomorrow’s possible lake-effect snow forecast, that is…

Tiny waterfall in stream behind house

Tiny waterfall in stream behind house

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