Avalanche from the front roof

Avalanche from the front roof

Roof shoveling day!  Time to get the heavy compressed icy snow off the roof-top.  Why, you ask?  Because neglecting to shovel roofs in this part of the world may result in collapsed dwellings.  Those desiring intact homes must bring out the shovels, snow scoops or snow rakes and get to work removing the snow.

Barry’s our roof shoveling guy.  Kathy’s the photographer.  Kathy gets kind of dizzy, wobbly and nervous up there twenty to thirty feet from the ground, and prefers solid footing underneath.  Barry worked hard for about 35 minutes this afternoon while Kathy cheered him on with frozen fingers attempting to catch photos of the blocks of snow careening from the roof.  Seventy five percent of the photos failed to capture any snow showers or blocks spraying down from overhead.

It was 8 degrees.  I’m assuming all you readers from foreign countries realize these numbers come in the Fahrenheit variety.  The sunshine and blue sky makes it look deceptively warm.  It was not. 

Our roof often needs to be shoveled several times a winter.  There’s one-shovel winters, two shovel winters and this year might even be a three-shovel gala season.  We’ve debated buying a metal roof (as exists on our garage and shed) but still can’t decide about re-roofing or removing the shingles from the house.  Metal roofs are not infallible.  Usually the snow slides cheerfully off the metal surface as it builds momentum, thereby eliminating the need for manual labor.  But sometimes the snow sticks and requires prodding.  Our roof pitch is not designed for friendly snow removal, so we often debate future roof plans as we sit on our deck sipping drinks on balmy summer afternoons.  Not today.  Today was Shoveling Day.

Another detriment of the metal roof design exists.  Sometimes the snow determines to exit from the metal all at one time.  A hundred (thousand?) tons of snow slides off and buries any passerbys meandering beneath.  We wouldn’t want buried family members or guests, would we?

Barry’s fishing partner actually suggested today that a blog-writer about roof shoveling should be up on the roof doing the work.  I am not pleased with this suggestion.  Fortunately, he assured her that was not the way blog-writing worked.  A blog-writer has the option of waiting down beneath, thinking up entertaining and informative ideas to share with the readers. 

Ice blocks fall from the back roof

Ice blocks fall from the back roof

Barry has roof-shoveling expertise to share with you readers.  He says it’s preferable to shovel after the snow has compressed into icy weights.  Then one can shear off an entire block with little fuss or hassle, watching it slide effortlessly off the roof.  If one attempts to shovel fluffy snow, it simply doesn’t work as efficiently.  However, if one waits too long, the house begins to strain under the snow-load.  It’s really a science.  One learns the best timing to remove snow from roofs if one lives in the North Woods long enough….

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